Call 250-682-0158 Login or Sign Up

Posts Tagged ‘trends’

Linda Klein Kamloops Real Estate Music in the park July 2015 Schedule

Sunday, July 5th, 2015

Music in the Park runs all summer long.

The free entertainment takes place 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., unless otherwise stated, each night at the Rotary Bandshell in Riverside Park, 100 Lorne St. All shows are rain or shine, but subject to change.

Included links to the bands, so you can check them out beforehand.


Riverside Park

July 1 – Canada Day celebrations

July 2 Tiller’s Folly (Canadiana celtic)

July 3 Greg Drummond (Canadian folk rock)

July 4 – Kingpins (classic rock)

July 5Gary Comeau and Cannery Row (Cajun)

July 6Nova Scotiables (East Coast)

July 7 – Beyond Brass (big band classics)

July 8 – Sean Ashby (Sarah McLachlan guitarist)

July 9 – Mike MacKenzie Blues Band (classic rock and blues)

July 10 – Hijacked by B.C. Living Arts – Tribute to Leonard Cohen, Bruce Cockburn and The Band with Van Damsel – 6:30 p.m.

July 11 – Hijacked by B.C. Living Arts – Tribute to Joni Mitchell, Neil Young and The Band with The Caspians and James Wolf – 6 p.m.

July 12Cécile Doo-Kingué (blues)

July 13100 Mile House (English folk roots)

July 14 – Wild T and The Spirit (blues)

July 15 – Scattered Atoms (blues and R&B)

July 16Sally and the Melo Hearts (current and classic rock)

July 17Sabrina Weeks and Swing Cat Bounce (blues)

July 18Ben Klick (country rock)

July 19 – Impulse Response (R&B)

July 20Jane Perrett (classical soprano and showtunes)

July 21 – Ben Caldwell and the Folk Road Show (roots and folk)

July 22Cod Gone Wild (Maritime fun)

July 23 – BCLC Midsummer Music Jam featuring Catch 22 (1980s music)

July 24 Sarah Burton (rockin’ roots pop)

July 25Sherman Doucette (blues harp)

July 26Dave Lang and the Insolent Rabble (swing jazz)

July 27Twin Peaks (duo)

July 28Tanner James Band (folk roots and country)

July 29Kirby Sewell Band (blues)

July 30 – The Longriders (Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute)

July 31 – Trama (rock)

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015


Courtesy of Cliff Brauner Pillar to Post Inspections

To be a clutter buster you’ve got to be able to identify which items are truly clutter, and which are not. Clutter can be insidious, because it can be almost anything, from obvious trash to the most expensive antiques.

The same object that may be clutter for one person is most certainly not for another person.

Here are five guidelines to use to decide if something in your space could be CLUTTER.

1. Clutter Can Be Anything – Cheap Or Expensive, Sentimental Or Throw Away
Know what is, and is not, clutter. Many people’s preconceived notion of clutter is true trash and cheap junk that we don’t care about at all. But remember “One man’s junk can be another man’s treasure.” Don’t automatically overlook something because it cost a lot of money. Even the most expensive things can be clutter.

2. Too Many of a Thing – is Clutter
Too much of a “good thing” happens when you amass a large selection of one particular item.

Collections can quickly turn from something that makes us happy into clutter if we’re not careful. Determine if these items are truly worth the while, or just items using up precious space.

A few of a particular item, such as shoes, clothes, or kitchen gadgets can provide temporary choice and variety. However, when you start to accumulate too many of a particular item it just becomes an overwhelming pile of clutter.

3. Items That Used To Be Functional – are Clutter
It often happens that we use an item for quite a while, and then our circumstances change and it is no longer quite as useful to us anymore. That’s when the item begins to collect dust in a corner – becoming clutter.

That’s the thing about clutter – it may have been useful stuff in the past. Be ever vigilant and notice when an item is no longer of use.

4. If You Don’t Have Room For It – It’s Clutter
You could have some really awesome stuff but if it doesn’t fit in your space, it’s clutter. This one is tough for even the most seasoned clutter buster, because people experience this all the time when downsizing. If it sits out collecting dust or becomes a tripping hazard, it just doesn’t belong there anymore.

Make sure you’re not devoting storage space to real clutter but make room for the important items. You only have so much space available. If you can’t make a home for something in your home, it unfortunately just doesn’t belong there.

5. If You Don’t Love or Use It – It’s Clutter
Everything in your home or office should, ideally, serve a purpose so you can live clutter free. It either helps you with something in your life or makes you feel something positive each time you see it.

If you’ve got too much stuff you simply can’t use all of it. After all, you can only wear so many clothes or shoes in a year!

You can only truly love so many things, and take the time to care for them, before you just don’t feel that attachment to those things anymore. Keep what’s important and ditch the rest!

Home Storage Solutions 101

Kamloops real estate Linda Klein Marble Counter care

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015


Your counters are the center pieces in your kitchen and bathroom, so keep them looking good with the following care and maintenance tips.

Clean daily with soft cloths and warm water and weekly with stone soap. Marble is more vulnerable to acidic cleaners than granite, and will also be dulled by regular use of soap.

Blot spills quickly because marble is sensitive to etching, particularly from acidic substances.

Do not cut directly on marble since it is softer than granite. Heat is unlikely to damage marble, but cracking from thermal shock is always possible with stone.

Regularly seal marble counters, avoids stains easier.

Courtesy of Cliff Brauner-Pillar to Post Home Inspections

Thinking of becoming a realtor… open letter by a realtor.

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Reposted letter BY

Real Estate Agent with RE/MAX Compass, formerly RE/MAX WHP
A Houston Texas realtor but some of the same comments apply here as well.

Several times a year I am approached by people who want to become a Realtor. Many of them think it’s a great way to supplement their income while they keep their day job. A lot of others are interested in a career change. I decided to type this blog to save myself time. Each time I’m asked I’ll simply send the inquiring person a link back to this post. So, with that said, grab your favorite beverage and read below, because you’re about to get a heavy dosage of what it’s like to start a real estate career.


1. PASSING THE EXAM is easy. Creating a business with real income is a different story.

2. Now that you have your license be prepared to lose friends and get your feelings hurt. Most, if not all of your friends and family will avoid using you the first year or two that you’re licensed. Simply put, you don’t know what the hell you’re doing. Earn your battle scares. Even after you’ve gained experience, you’ll have friends and family who will not work with you because you’re a friend or because you are family. It happens every day to Realtors across the country.

3. If you don’t spend money you won’t make money. You needs to spend THOUSANDS of dollars to create a business. Most of what you are thinking is a cute and new idea has already been tried a thousand times. You will do what every new agent does… spend money (A LOT OF IT) on the wrong things. Over and over again. There’s a famous saying in this business…”If you want to get rich in real estate, sell stuff to Realtors.”

4. You and your smart phone will become inseparable. You will have to get up from eating, watching a movie and sleeping to take calls, return emails and respond to text messages. Of course you don’t have to do this, but you also don’t have to make any real money in this business. You’ll get out of it what you put into it. Ignoring a call could be a $20,000 mistake. Or more.

5. Be prepared to be second guessed, doubted, questioned, accused and lied to repeatedly. Buyers and sellers have the propensity to lie just like you and the guy next to you at the grocery store. People have perceptions about lawyers, mechanics and police officers. They have them about us too. Even after years of experience there will be clients who will second guess your every move. This will never go away.

6. You will show thousands of houses. Showing a house isn’t just about unlocking a door. Sometimes you get rained on while showing. Sometimes the house says active on the market when it’s already under contract with another buyer. Sometimes you are late to the appointment because of traffic. Maybe your buyer will be late. The number of things that can go wrong are practically endless.

7. Almost nobody will respect your time. Almost everyone thinks you are over paid.

8. Expect people to ask for kickbacks both legally and illegally. Buyers and sellers will often want to haggle with your commission.

9. You will pay taxes. A lot of taxes. Expect to pay for the gizmo you use to unlock doors. You will pay for this yearly along with dues to three different associations. You’ll pay for signs, lock boxes, tools, equipment, cameras, advertising for both you and your listings, leads, websites and on and on and on.

10. You will pay for your own health and life insurance. There is no 401k matching in real estate. You are an independent contractor. In fact, YOU will PAY to be at your local real estate office! The broker will take money from you. You will also pay for an office if you want one. Your phone is your costs. Your internet is also your costs. So is your paper, pens and everything else imaginable. You’re running a small business. It’s ALL your costs. You’ll also pay for errors and omissions insurance. The list is really long. Yay!

11. You will get screwed in this business. It’s not for the naive, light hearted, ignorant or thin skinned. You will work your rear end off and sometimes not make a dime.

12. You will deal with a certain number of psychopaths each year.

13. You will meet criminals, convicts and felons, especially if you work in the leasing industry.

14. Strange men and women will ask you to meet them at houses RIGHT NOW.

15. You might get a gun pointed at you while showing a house or two. Sometimes rabid Pitt bulls will chase you down.

16. Expect to get towed at least once.

17. Eventually you’ll get in a wreck while showing. You better hope your clients aren’t with you. Is your auto insurance updated correctly?

18. There is no disability insurance. So, if you break a leg while playing softball you’re screwed. It’s going to hurt your business.

19. You might get sued even when you aren’t at fault.

20. When you become successful your competitors might file complaints on you because they are jealous. You won’t like this.

21. As you show houses you’ll be in questionable neighborhoods from time-to-time. You need to learn self-defense, carry a gun or a can of mace. Everyone should be concerned about their safety.

22. Be prepared to leave a social event early to run and show a house or to get yelled at by one of your clients for something you did not do. It doesn’t matter, you are the chew toy sometimes.

23. It’s likely you’ll get audited by the IRS. You have too many write offs and once again… you make too much money.

24. Lawyers are annoyed by Realtors.

25. Expect to list homes and never sell them. No agent sells every home they list. You will waste time, money, energy and resources.

26. Your signs will be stolen, spray painted and eventually played with by the local kids.

27. Your flyer box will always be empty because kids, passerby’s and neighbors will take too many. Sometimes they’ll take all of them in one day. Then you’ll be chastised for not having flyers in the flyer box.

28. Did I mention you’ll deal with at least two crazy people each year?

29. EACH real estate transaction you work means you are likely dealing with at least 8 different people.You’re responsible for 15-20 things. Right now I am trying to close 11 contracts. I am a little stressed. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night thinking about my paperwork, my clients and my business.

30. You will become an unlicensed therapist, divorced lawyer and counselor. You aren’t allowed to give legal advice, and you shouldn’t. You aren’t a doctor, but everyone will unload their personal lives with you. You will sometimes live their life.

31. Your spouse will at times hate what you do for a living. 

32. Your wife/husband will despise the fact that you are always on your phone.

33. When you’re sick… you still work. There’s no floating holidays.

34. While on vacation…. you still work. You can get an agent to cover your business, but NOBODY will care for your business the way you do.

35. Sometimes when you make mistakes it costs people money. You can’t just apologize.

36. You have to have a nice car. You must wear nice clothes.

37. When you first get started everyone will know you don’t know what you’re talking about. It’s a fact. This sucks. But if you stick it out, you’ll be okay. 75% of the new agents don’t make it.

38. You get to work with agents! Not all of them are put together correctly. A lot of your problems in this business will be because of the other agent. You will get upset, angry, pissed and offended. Ego’s are here too.

39. Wait for it….. friends, neighbors and family will ask you for real estate advice while they are involved in a real estate transaction….. YOU aren’t.

40. Other Realtors will give your client advice when they aren’t supposed to. Every buyer and every seller knows an agent somewhere.

41. Each market is different. Very different sometimes, but that won’t stop friends and family from influencing your client. Your client will become confused at times.

42. You have a better chance of meeting E.T. than you do working real estate part-time and being successful. It takes time, effort and money to be a part-time Realtor. In fact, being a part-time agent can be even more difficult.

So why do agents do this?

You’ll have the amazing opportunity to reap what you sow. You can work when you want. No matter how bad your boss is (client) you are only working for them for a certain period of time. You get new bosses all the time. You can make a real difference in a lot of people’s lives. You literally help shape dreams. YOU can be the difference in someones life as they look to sell and buy a home. And not all clients, buyers and sellers are bad. Most of them get it. It’s awesome when everything works out.

And sometimes the money is really good.

Tips for staging a bathroom

Sunday, January 18th, 2015

When staging a bathroom, it pays to think of some of the most used bathrooms in the world – those in hotels – and model your client’s water closet after that.

“People love to walk into the hotel bathroom and see everything is new and clean and the towels are perfect and everything is lined up,” Ella Zetser of The Last Detail Home Staging, tells REP. “It makes you feel like no one has used it before.”

That fresh tone is what agents should be going for, but how do you get there? Here are eight tips for expertly staging a bathroom.

1 – Remove clutter and clean
As with any room in the house, a good clean and a solid de-cluttering works wonders. Bathrooms, of course, should be spick-and-span and free from knick-knacks and other miscellaneous items.

“[Selling agents] need to remove all the clutter,” Zetser says. “There shouldn’t be anything in the bathroom other than white towels – which reminds [buyers] of a hotel. Make sure it’s clean. All the toiletries should be gone.”

2 – Play up the vanity
When potential buyers walk into a bathroom, the sink and vanity are usually the first things they see, and Zetser says that should be what agents embellish.

“The focal point, usually, is the sink, the vanity,” she says. “That’s where the buyer usually walks in and they’re looking for that. That’s where they’re going to.”

3 – Add flowers
Flowers are the easiest way to brighten up a space, and a bathroom is no different. They smell great, they can match any existing colour scheme or style, and they’re (relatively) cheap.

“Flowers make a new focal point,” Zetser says, “and it adds colour.”

4 – Light it up
There’s nothing worse than a great bathroom mirror with poor lighting. Check that the lights around the vanity are in good condition and that the light fixtures are not outdated.

“[Agents] should really look at the functionality and the condition of the bathroom,” Zetser says. “Check if the light fixture over the vanity is in good condition – does it have the right bulbs, does it look nice. Sometimes by changing the light fixture it makes the bathroom look like a whole different bathroom.”
5 – Art and Mirrors
Art isn’t just for living rooms and sleeping quarters. Bathrooms, too, can benefit from a painting or picture. And, as Zetser explains, strategically placed art can make the bathroom look larger.

“We also like to put art in the bathroom so it reflects in the mirror,” she says. “So when you walk in, the mirror has the sink right below it and the light above it. Then you have the art behind it, and you see the art in the mirror and it makes the bathroom look bigger.”

6 – The curtain versus door debate
You might not believe it, but Zetser suggests replacing sliding shower doors with – gasp! – a white shower curtain.

“A sliding door makes the bathroom look old, so I recommend getting a shower curtain,” she says. “They make the bathroom look tight. They close off the tub.”

7 – To bath mat or not to bath mat
Bath mats were once staples of the bathroom, but Zetser says they’re an option in the modern bath, depending heavily on the floor beneath it.

“If the floor is not updated, you might want to cover with a bath mat,” she says. “But if it’s a beautiful floor you do not want to cover it up.”

8 – Colour
Like the rest of the bathroom, the colour of the walls should mimic a hotel bathroom, exuding a feeling of calm.

“Most of the time, a good colour is light blue or beige or light grey,” Zetser says. “But sometimes painting it a dark colour makes it moody and more expensive-looking. But you should paint it to match the rest of the bathroom.”




Comparative Statistics for Kamloops December 2014 to November 2014

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015
     December                    2014     November              2014
Number of New Listings          195          267 26.97% DOWN
Residential Units Sold          123          146 15.75% DOWN
Avg. Days on Market           76           77 1.30% DOWN
List to Sell Price Ratio        96.50%        97.79% 1.32% DOWN
Median Residential Price     $344,000    $355,000 3.10% DOWN
Total Monthly Sales $$    $39,265,843    $42,443,621 7.49% DOWN
Active Listings      1569      1789 12.30% DOWN


About Royal LePage

Thursday, January 8th, 2015


Royal LePage is Canada’s oldest and largest Canadian owned real estate company. Founded in 1913 by Albert LePage when he was just 26 years old, Royal LePage is now Canada’s largest real estate company with more than 14,000 agents in more than 600 locations across the country. And we firmly believe that you can only become the oldest and largest company by being the best.

Over the years, we’ve learned a lot about real estate – and how to provide the best possible service for our clients. Since the mid-1990s, Royal LePage has more than tripled the size of its sales force and almost doubled its market share.

Throughout our successes, we remain dedicated to helping you through the real estate process. Our commitment to innovation and customer service is as strong as ever.

We offer all of our REALTORS® – from those serving tiny communities to those in major urban centres – strong support from our national pool of knowledge, skill and technical expertise. We regularly invest time, money and resources to develop and provide the knowledge and tools they need to best market your home, including:

  • Up-to-date information about local market conditions
  • Quarterly housing reports
  • Creative brochures and newspaper ads to showcase your home
  • Ongoing negotiation, marketing and technical training

Snowshoeing in Kamloops, fun winter activity for all ages

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

Snowshoeing in Kamloops, British Columbia


Snowshoeing in Kamloops, BC


This is one of the most popular and invigorating winter activities that can be done almost anywhere. Snowshoeing in Kamloops is easy to do with a diverse number of areas to get out and explore, from quiet, snow-laden forests and open clearings to Riverside Park located in the heart of downtown Kamloops.

Pack a thermos of hot chocolate and a snack and make a day of it, or just head out for an afternoon breaking a snowy trail under gorgeous sunny skies.


Here are some recommended areas to try:

> Stake Lake: Stake Lake is located 25 minutes south of Kamloops on Lac Le Jeune Road and is a beautiful area to snowshoe with 5 snowshoe trails making up 12km of trails. Rentals of snowshoes are available for both on ($10) and off ($20) the Stake Lake trails. For information on rates, click here.

> Sun Peaks Resort: The snowshoeing trails at Sun Peaks Resort are world class. Enjoy lunch in the Village and then set out for an afternoon of exploring the beautiful resort on snowshoes.

> McConnel Lake Provincial Park: McConnel Lake is located 35km south of Kamloops (take Lac Le Jeune Exit off of HWY 5). The trail around the lake is about 4km and is great for snowshoeing!

> Lac du Bois Provincial Park: Although there are no designated trails, snowshoeing provides a way to experience this beautiful park.

> Kenna Cartwright Park: With its extensive trail system, Kenna Cartwright provides a great place to snowshoe right in town.

> Harper Mountain: Located only 20 minutes from Kamloops, Harper Mountain not only has skiing & tubing available but also has great snoeshoeing! Enjoy a 1km loop then stop in the Lodge for some hot cocoa.


Housing starts across Canada remain flat except growing momentum in B.C

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

Housing starts across Canada remained flat year over year in November, although seasonally-adjusted numbers point to growing momentum in British Columbia and Quebec as developers ramp up to meet immigration demands.

“The trend essentially held steady for a third consecutive month in November,” said Bob Dugan, CMHC’s chief economist, in releasing November numbers Monday. “This is in line with our expectations for 2014, of a stable national picture with new home building concentrated in multiple starts, particularly in Quebec, British Columbia and Ontario.”

Seasonally adjusted starts in November climbed 6.5 per cent month-over-month to 195,620 units. More than half of those starts were multi-unit properties in urban centres, led largely by Ontario and Quebec, though British Columbia posted the largest gains – 26.7 per cent – from October.

t’s important to note, say analysts, that starts were flat from the year-ago period.

While reports suggested overbuilding would become a problem for Canada’s major urban centres, CMHC said more housing is needed to fill the demand created by healthy immigration.

“Ask any real estate developer in any of Canada’s major cities about the risk of overbuilding, and the first line of defense would be immigration and its critical role in supporting demand,” said Benjamin Tal, CIBC’s deputy chief economist. “It turns out that, at least for now, this claim is more valid than widely believed.”

New immigrants account for 70 per cent of the increase in Canada’s population. Half of these new immigrants are aged between 25 and 44, representing the country’s economic engine, according to CMHC’s 2014 Canadian Housing Observer.

House sense, great ideas for lighting, optimizing space, decorating for winter

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Autumn brings with it shorter days and colder nights which can add up to increased electric costs. Finding a way to save money, and, keep your home warm and well lit will no doubt be a priority with most homeowners. One way to save is to replace incandescent and CFL light bulbs with LED bulbs. LED bulbs are considered direct replacements for the 175-year-old incandescent bulb and the more modern, environmentally unfriendly, CFL bulb.

Here are a few reasons why LED bulbs are better.

1. Energy Efficiency. One 11.5-watt LED bulb emits as much light as a standard 60-watt incandescent bulb. That means five LED bulbs still use less electricity than a single incandescent lamp.

2. Replacement. Incandescent bulbs typically have a life of no more than 1,000 hours, while LED bulbs may have 40,000 hours of life.
That is 40 times more.

3. Instant Start. CFL bulbs have a warm-up period each time you turn them on. LED bulbs turn on at full brightness.

4. Dimmable. LED products are fully dimmable and are compatable with more than 100 different dimmer switches. CFL bulbs may be dimmable but still have a flicker tendency.

5. Disposal. It is safe to place LED bulbs in the garbage, after they burn out. CFL bulbs contain mercury and must be recycled through using the correct facilities.

6. Heat. LED bulbs emit very little heat. CFLs and incandescent bulbs waste 80 to 90 per cent of their energy in heat. LED bulbs typically waste no more than 50 percent of their energy on heat and are far cooler to the touch.

Although your home reflects your personal style, trends help trigger your creativity and provide the opportunity to shake things up a little. Here are a few hot home trends:

1. Shower Spa – Seek a serene, spa-like shower environment with a curb-less design for a spacious perfect and open shower experience.

2. Open It Up – Open plan kitchens are expanding even further with glass front cabinets and open shelving units to give the feel of even more space.

3. Smart Sensors – Using Environmentally – friendly Smart Thermostats save energy by automatically adjusting the temperature based on your daily routine.

4. Back to Nature – Add value and comfort by blending indoor and outdoor living space. All-weather furniture and outdoor fireplaces are top picks.

5. U-Sockets – The smallest upgrade can make the biggest difference! U-sockets are wall plugs with two built-in USB ports that can be used to power devices such as tablets and smartphones.

The average home is shrinking now that our urban centres are getting so dense. But this should not get in the way of enjoying your small home, condo or cottage. Here are some tricks to optimize all available space.

1. Use a light, neutral palette on the walls to give your home a larger feel. Amplify natural light in your space with lighter colors. Use a second color from the same palette to break up an open space into more distinct areas.

2. Play with brighter colors in the details to avoid a bland or clinical feel. Use colorful accent pillows or artwork to add some more punch.

3. Avoid clutter to help a room appear more spacious. Keep everything tucked away while it is not in use to make your space less congested.

4. Protect it from the sun. For carpet in a sunny area, close the drapes to prevent fading.

4. Make multi-functioning furniture choices. A headboard could double as a bookcase. Furniture that has built-in storage is a plus – one more space to tuck things away.

The data included on this website is deemed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed to be accurate by the Kamloops Real Estate Board. The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS® and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.